Right before Christmas, on December 22, we published our twentieth issue and completed our fifth year in existence. If you haven’t read that issue yet, let’s take a look at what you’ll find inside.

Feature: Artisanal Bread in the Marketplace

Feature

In our first ever feature section, we dive deep into the question about the differences between artisanal and industrial bread and where the artisanal bread movement fits in the big picture of bread.

Through interviews with Daniel Leader (Bread Alone) and Karl de Smedt (Puratos), we peek into what happens when bread is made on a bigger scale than the small operations we have devoted most of our attention so far. The two bakers have some thought provoking things to say, and hearing them out is a fine challenge for everyone interested in the business of bread!

The feature ends with a commentary article in which François Thibeault and Jarkko Laine combine their thoughts from the two interviews they conducted into a suggestion for a way to approach the world of bread in a constructive and positive — but also passionately artisanal way.

One of the goals for the feature is to generate discussion, so if you’ve read the articles, we’d love to hear what you thought about them. Leave a comment below!

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The Little Things That Sustain Us

The Little Things that Sustain Us

After decades of antibacterial soaps and fear for germs, scientists are starting to see the full, complex and interdependent relationship between humans, plants and the “little things that sustain us.”

In this issue, Don Sadowsky takes you on a journey into the world of microbes, reporting on the most promising recent findings from microbiology labs and how they relate to wheat, bread and therefore our individual well-being.

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Bread Trail: Sweden

Bread Trail

François Thibeault’s “Bread Trail” column (which began in the Summer 2016 issue) continues with a story of his trip through Sweden where he learned about the Swedish flatbread, tunnbröd and visited Heléne Johansson’s artisanal bakery, Brunkebergs Bageri, in Stockholm.

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Babettes Artisan Bakery

Babettes Artisan Bakery

Visiting her sister in Denver, Colorado, Tia Ingle stumbled on what she calls “Denver’s best kept secret,” Babettes Artisan Bakery. In this article, she shares the tips and advice she learned in her chat with the bakery’s founder and hear baker, Steve Scott.

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Sprouted Buckwheat Sourdough

Sprouted Buckwheat Sourdough

In the first recipe in this issue, Maurizio Leo shows you how using buckwheat in your bread will give it whole new dimensions in color, texture, and flavor. The pseudo-cereal is the perfect match for the cold winter nights.

As Maurizio writes:

The deep dark fissures and a slight gray cast is a prelude to what this bread is all about. A touch of sweetness, slightly sour, earthy and creamy — a concert of flavors and textures in this sprouted buckwheat sourdough. This bread is a perfect companion for the cold days ahead.

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Panettone

Panettone

In this issue’s seasonal recipe, Suzanne Dunaway’s memories from her Christmases and New Year’s Eves spent in Rome lead you to the season for the Italian favorite, and her recipe gets you started with baking your own — in coffee cans!

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Get Your Copy Now

As usual, the 92-page issue is published as a beautiful, handcrafted PDF magazine.

You can buy an individual issue for $2.99.

Or you can read all of our issues for $24 by getting a 1-Year Subscription.

Starting in 2017, our new issues will cost $9 each, if bought individually. However, for only $24, you’ll get access to our entire catalog of downloadable magazines for a year — including the next three we’ll publish in 2017!

In all, if bought separately, these issues would cost $75.

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We hope you’ll enjoy this issue!